UK Winter Getaway Ideas

There are those who look forward to winter, excited over hushed conversations by the fireplace and being bundled up in the most comfortable and stylish winter clothes. Then, there are those who simply want to get away from everything winter, like the snow, the grey skies, and the utter discomfort of a -0.1°C. I must admit, I usually feel pretty smug around this time of year, when I’m cosy and wrapped up working from home, watching netflix, browsing the internet with the heating on full blast.

This list will help you decide where best to go to avoid the unforgiving cold.

  1. Tynemouth, Tyneside may just be the perfect choice for those who want to go cycling. All they have to do is drive up to the Coast and Castle cycle route and they’re good to go. Seekers of souvenirs may want to drop by Georgian Front Street where a row of independent shops that look out the seaside clifftop ruins of the Tynemouth Priory are. There are also plenty of modest apartments and B&Bs around the place, so be sure to check them out.
  2. Boscastle, Cornwall is an Atlantic village devastated by floods some ten years ago. Now, it’s back to its old self–craggy cliffs, green water in the harbour inlet, and smoke curling up from the chimneys in the old cottages, just like before. For those interested, you can pay a visit to the Witchcraft Museum where the largest collection of witchcraft related artefacts and regalia can be found. However, it’s the walks that you really want to experience. The rocky paths of the Bossiney Cove or Tintagel are blessedly empty after summer.
  3. Southport, Merseyside has the peculiar British Lawnmower Museum that will guarantee to make for a memorable trip. There is also the Marine Lake there where you can go boating and watch birds. The shore may not be too endearing, but the beach is wide and stretches for miles reaching to Formby Point. Pay a visit as well to Warehouse, a restaurant co-owned by Liverpool footballer Steven Gerrard.
  4. Portmeirion, Gwynedd is an Italianate tourist spot, a version of Italy’s Portofino on the Dwyryd estuary. Built and designed by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, this destination boasts of a Mediterranean feel where there is a dazzling piazza, a domed Pantheon, statuaries, colonnades, watery vistas, topiaries, and loggias. The pretty cottages might look like neat houses, but no one actually lives there. They are actually holiday lets or hotels. Check out Tremadog Bay and find hidden coves and views.
  5. Oban, Argyll, West Highlands is also known as Scotland’s seafood capital. It is also a busy little harbour town where it’s difficult to get a seat in any of its restaurants if you happen to drive by and pay a visit on-season. Head up to the white sand beaches of Ganavan, or hike up to McCaig’s Tower, a 19th century coliseum lookalike where it’s best to watch ferries at sunset.
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